REFERENCES

“Tell me, and I will forget. Show me, and I may remember. Involve me, and I will understand.” The great thinker Confucius knew already 2500 years ago how to make knowledge stick better in people's minds.

INSPIRED AND BACKED UP BY GREAT MINDS
Our educational approach is backed up by scientific findings and research studies from some of the world’s most experienced minds within the fields of psychology and education. It is inspired by great people from all corners of the world as well as from modern and ancient times. We also include a heavy dose of common sense, and our own experiences from the 20 years we’ve been communicating with young people.

The people and institutions listed below have inspired us to develop our programs, and to continue developing them in order to suit new times and different cultures:

 

1. PEDAGOGY AND METHODS:

The pedagogical process and the educational methods we use are well documented in science and literature from all corners of the world. Studying our programs you will discover why non-formal learning works so well with young people, and understand why we use interaction and creativity in all of the activities we practice. Please find below, some of the sources and minds that are backing us up on these ideas:

NON-FORMAL EDUCATION
– Council of Europe (2002). Manual on human rights education with young people:.
– Council of Europe (2010). Council of Europe Charter for democratic citizenship and human rights education.
– Werquin (2010). OECD: Recognition on non-formal and informal learning.
– UNESCO (2006). Synergies between formal and non-formal education.
– UNESCO Bangkok (2002). Innovations in non-formal education: A review of selected initiatives from the Asia-Pacific Region.

INTERACTION
– US Department of Education (2009). U.S. Department of Education study finds that good teaching can be enhanced with new technology
– Gardner (1983). Frames of mind: The theory of multiple intelligences.
– Fusoni, Pollack (2005). Moving beyond icebreakers: Why use interactive methods?
– Daniels, Edwards, Säljö (2014). European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI), International Society for Cultural and Activity Research  (ISCAR): Learning culture and social interaction.

CREATIVITY
–Sternberg (2006). The nature of creativity.

TRAINING AND FACILITATION
– Bailey, Brown, Hunter, Thorpe (2009). The Art of Facilitation: The essentials for leading great meetings and creating group synergy.

REFLECTION
– Knapp (1992). Lasting Lessons: A teacher’s guide to reflecting on experience.


2. LEARNING TECHNIQUES:

The learning techniques we use throughout our programs are all well known and have documented positive results concerning the outcome in learning processes. By understanding more about these techniques we learn to be better prepared and we feel safer when guiding groups through our sessions and activities. Please find below, some of the sources and minds that we have learned from and been inspired by:

BRAINSTORMING                 
– Bottger, Yetton (1987). Improving group performance by training in individual problem solving.
– Osborn (1963). Applied Imagination: Principles and procedures of creative problem solving.

COOPERATION
– Slavin (1991). Cooperative learning. Journal of Behavioral Education.
– Wood (1987). Fostering cooperative learning in the middle and secondary level classrooms.

CREATIVE EXPRESSION
– Kochhar (1977). Methods and techniques of teaching.
– Shaeffer (2005). UNESCO: Educating for creativity: Bringing the arts and culture into Asian education.
– Sternberg (2006). The nature of creativity.

DISCUSSION
– O’Sullivan (1999). Transformative Learning: Educational vision for the 21st century.

EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION
– Calder, Cox, Fien, Law (2014). UNESCO: Teaching and learning for a sustainable future.
– Kolb (1983). Experiential Learning: Experience as the source of learning and development.
– Poorman (2002). Biography and role-playing.

ROLE-PLAYING
– O’Sullivan (1999). Transformative Learning: Educational vision for the 21st century.
– Pant (1999). UNESCO Guidelines. Participatory life long learning.

VALUES EDUCATION
– Calder, Cox, Fien, Law (2014). UNESCO: Teaching and learning for a sustainable future.
– Clement, Lovat, Toomey (2010). International research handbook on values education and student wellbeing.


3. SUBJECTS:

Our three subjects: self-esteem, conflict management and non-violence have been chosen and packaged to suit the conditions we deal with. We provide our trainers with theories and practical information from some of the most renowned scientists in the fields of education and psychology, along with evidence-based facts and statistics to back up what we say and do in our programs. Please find below, some of the sources and minds that we have learned from and been inspired by concerning our subjects:
 

1. SELF-ESTEEM

Self-esteem
– Fanning, McKay (2000). Self-Esteem: A proven program of cognitive techniques for assessing, improving and maintaining your self-esteem.
– Schutz (1994). The Human Element: Productivity, self-esteem, and the bottom line.
– Alber, Miller (2012). The new heart at work. Stories and strategies for building self-esteem and reawakening the soul at work.

Needs
– Clement, Lovat, Toomey (2010). International research handbook on values education and student wellbeing.   
– Goble (2007). The Third Force: The psychology of Abraham Maslow.
– Marker (2003). Unmet Human Needs. Beyond Intractability.

Feelings
– Goleman (1995). Emotional intelligence.
– Mayer, Salovey (1990). Emotional intelligence.
– Salovey, Sluyter (1997). Emotional Development and emotional intelligence.
– Bracket, Lopes, Nezlek, Salovey, Schütz, Sellin (2004). Emotional intelligence and social interaction.


2. CONFLICT MANAGEMENT

Conflict
– Stack (2005). Conflict can be positive and productive.
– Costantino, Merchant (1995). Designing Conflict Management.   
– Galtung (2009). Theories of conflict, definitions, dimensions, negations, formations.
– Galtung, Webel (2007). Handbook of peace and conflict studies.
– Galtung (2000). Conflict transformation by peaceful means. United Nations Disaster Management Training Programme (DMTP).
– Glasl (1999). Confronting conflicts.
– Jordan (2000). Glasl’s nine-stage model of conflict escalation.

Managing conflicts
– Stack (2005). Conflict can be positive and productive.
– Thomas, Kilmann (1974) The Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument.
– Matjacic (2010). Mapping the conflict. RMIT University. Melbourne, Australia.
– Moore, Woodrow (2010). Handbook of global and multicultural negotiation.
– Sebenius (2014). The Harvard Negotiation Project (HNP).

Communication
– Edwards, Gordon (1997). Making patient your partner. Communication skills for doctors and other caregivers.
– Gordon (2008). Parent effectiveness training: The proven program for raising responsible children.
– Rosenberg (2003). Nonviolent communication: A language of life.
– Burgess (2003). I-Messages and You-Messages. University of Colorado.
– Rosenberg (2004). Teaching children compassionately: How students and teachers can succeed with mutual understanding.


3. NON-VIOLENCE

Violence
– Fountain (2004). United Nations, Our right to be protected from violence.
– Galtung, Webel (2007). Handbook of peace and conflict studies.
– Great Britain Parliament, House of Commons (2006). Conflict and Development: Peacebuilding and Post-conflict Resolution.
– Galtung (2000). United Nations, Conflict transformation by peaceful means.
– United Nations (1989). United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.
– WHO (2002). World report on violence and health.
– WHO (2004). Preventing violence: A guide to implementing the recommendations of the World report on violence and health.
– Kwast, Laws (2002). UN Secretary-General’s study on violence against children.

Non-violence 
– Wikipedia (2014) Bhagavad Gita
– Wikipedia (2014) Ahimsa

Non-violence role models
– The information about our role models has been collected from various online search results as well as memoares and books about respective individual.

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